Icom Earpieces – Show Them Some I.D or You’ll Have to Leave

Can’t get over how low-priced the radio accessory is, a tremendous deal for a top-end product!

Flash back with me to a time in my life when I still hadn’t gotten my act together…

At age 20, I was shaggy haired, absent minded and into rock n roll in a big way (waitaminute – I’m still shaggy haired, absent minded and into rock n roll in a big way…). I was dating a pole dancer, singing in a grotty band and telling anyone who would listen that I wanted to get out of this crappy little town and really make something of my life. I guess, in some respects I was a bit like George Bailey of Bedford Falls, (if George Bailey was kind of a dick and made a point of saying the ‘F’ word in every second sentence…)

To make ends meet, while I waited in frustration for George Carlin to turn up in his time travelling phone box and help me usher in an era of world peace, I worked at a couple of jobs. Specifically, one evening a week, I was employed as a Youth Worker.

To my surprise, I found the job to be really fun, as well as very rewarding. Since I was an expert in all things media (with a Uni Certificate to prove it), I began a project that would teach the kids all about film making, music and the media in general.

One of my best students was a somewhat troubled boy with a hard stare and a ‘brick sh!thouse’ build. When I wasn’t pulling him off various youths who may or may not have mouthed off his sister, we got along pretty well. After I left the job a couple of years later, we actually became firm friends. He has also become particularly close to my brother (who was also a Youth Worker for a while) and my parents.

Without a trace of sarcasm, watching this tough, conflicted boy grow up to become a decent, hard working man has been both an honour and a privilege. However, he floundered for a long time as he searched for work. It just seemed that there wasn’t anything he was able to apply himself to.

Then, all of a sudden, he found his vocation. My friend is now a fully certified bouncer, working the door at a number of pubs, clubs, venues and bars.

In order to communicate easily without causing too much of a fuss, bouncers like my friend frequently use Icom Earpieces. These earpieces come in several forms, with 3 pin, multi pin, straight pin and high angled forms all catered for. You can also find an Icom earpiece for almost any type of radio imaginable.

There’s no fuss, as the earpieces can be operated simply and discreetly and, being reinforced with Kevlar, they are every bit as hard wearing as the two-way radios they work with.

Icom have been trading in quality radio equipment since 1954, so they know what they are doing and how to make customers happy whilst doing it. Icom Earpieces are solid, reliable and high spec, so it’s no wonder that so many in the security industry choose to wear them.

As for my friend, it looks like he has got himself on track; he’s found a job that he is good for as well as one that is good for him. I may have made my share of mistakes back then, but I was certainly right about one or two things.

MOTOTRBO Delivers Integrates GPS, Text Messaging and Voice to Cut Response Times for Tbilisi.

This site was interesting to us so i just wanted to share with all my readers

Leveraging Digital Technology for Fast, Efficient Emergency Services

Named the “033 service” after the country’s emergency response telephone number, Tbilisi Medical Emergency Response Service Centre operates in and around the Georgian capital. The service provides 24/7 emergency medical care for Tbilisi’s 1.3 million citizens from its 120 ambulances and intensive care vehicles.

Tbilisi Requires Advanced Digital Technology while Optimising its Investment in Analogue Radios

Tbilisi Medical was upgrading its fleet to provide new ambulances and equipment for its skilled emergency teams. As part of the modernisation programme, Tbilisi Medical wanted to replace its existing Motorola analogue two-way radios with a digital system. Investing in a leading edge, future-proofed solution would help it save more lives by delivering uncompromising clarity for life-or-death critical communications to improve emergency response times.

In addition to ensuring complete coverage across the city and its outskirts, Tbilisi Medical wanted to combine voice, text and position location services in a single device. Text messaging would allow paramedics and first-aid teams to record and share written details of a patient’s condition, prognosis and recommended treatment. GPS capability would give ambulance controllers a
real-time status of each vehicle’s current location and activity to minimise delays in despatching medical crews to the scene of an accident.

Also important was compatibility with the analogue radios used by doctors at the 10 hospitals in and around Tbilisi to where casualties are transported. The service needed a solution that was both affordable and could meet all its communications needs cost effectively. Tbilisi Medical’s long-term supplier and Motorola Licensed Partner recommended MOTOTRBO for its breadth of coverage, unrivalled audio clarity, cost-effective use of spectrum and depth of functionality.

Next-Generation Communications at an Affordable Price

The Motorola Authorised Partner set up MOTOTRBO base stations and DR3000 repeaters at Tbilisi Medical’s two control centres, installed a Motorola DM3601 enhanced display mobile radio in each of the 200 ambulances and built the GPS interfaces. Tbilisi Medical also purchased 60 DP3600 portable display and keypad radios for use by medical response teams working at the scene of an accident or in a patient’s home. The display panel allows users to create and receive text messages, identify callers, scan channels and monitor traffic. The DP3600’s navigation buttons allow rapid access to the radio’s intuitive, menu-driven features and one-touch programmable options. A large, textured push-to-talk button ensures ease of use, even when wearing gloves.

MOTOTRBO’s support for digital TDMA technology splits a single channel into two virtual channels
to provide twice the capacity of analogue. This gives Tbilisi Medical six channels for the cost of three and halves the number of base stations and repeaters needed. Two of the three channels are used to cover the east and west sides of the city, with each one providing voice and data over one virtual channel and GPS services over the other. The third channel is a dedicated emergency response covering the entire city. This has also been split to manage voice/data and GPS.

The Motorola Authorised Partner managed user training for the new MOTOTRBO system. Ambulance crews were quick to learn how to
operate the DP3600s and became competent users after just 12 minutes training. The eight control room dispatchers quickly adapted to the new system and continue to work closely with MZE to refine channel tuning and define and implement new functionality as they need it.

MOTOTRBO’s backward-and forward-compatible platform means that radios can be switched to analogue mode when ambulance crews need to liaise with hospital staff. Compatibility with analogue allows the migration to digital to be phased in over several years as part of the ongoing upgrade of its two-way radios.

MOTOTRBO’s built-in location tracking functionality has been activated in the Motorola DM3601 mobile radios to give controllers a real-time display of fleet activity. Dispatchers can programme the system to receive the geographical coordinates of each vehicle at pre-programmed intervals, on demand or upon pressing the emergency button. Integrated position location is of critical importance to Tbilisi Medical Emergency Response Service Centre and optimises fleet management, scheduling, route planning

and despatching. Working from accurate real-time information is critical for controllers at the point of decision and helps save time, money and lives.

The robustness of the DP3600 hand portables, that are also dustproof and water resistant, enables them to withstand sustained rough use in all weather conditions. The long-life battery also helps improve efficiency by allowing emergency crews to use the radios for around 16 hours before recharging is needed.

MOTOTRBO Helps Save Time, Money and Lives

MOTOTRBO has streamlined both routine and emergency call-outs for Tbilisi Medical. The improved speech clarity of digital over analogue means clearer communications, with messages getting through first time, even against the background of traffic in a noisy street. The wider range has eliminated communication black spots at the city limits while integrated GPS has optimised response times. Digital also enables users to make one-to-one as well as group calls, which means that medical crews only receive calls that are relevant to them. MOTOTRBO’s emergency and man-down features ensure that all users are alerted instantly to a colleague in distress or requiring immediate assistance. MOTOTRBO is also highly affordable and meets all Tbilisi Medical’s communications needs at a fraction of the cost of alternative solutions.

Tbilisi Medical is the first emergency response service in the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) to purchase MOTOTRBO, but anticipates that others will follow its lead. MOTOTRBO’s advanced digital platform breaks through to new levels of performance and allows organisations to meet their future needs flexibly and cost-effectively. Tbilisi Medical anticipates achieving a return on its investment in MOTOTRBO within 12 months.

Sony NWZ-WH303 headphones review

What will you do if i stated I had found a earpiece short article that is not only interesting but informative as well? I knew you would not believe me, so here it is the informative, superb and fascinating editorial

headset. earphonesSony NWZ-WH303 headphones review
Love

It can even blast songs out of the built-in speakers, if you really want to annoy everyone on the bus. But can it compete with the likes of the Sennheiser Momentum On-Ear in terms of performance?

Sony NWZ-WH303: Size and build

The Sony NWZ-WH303 is a chunky old pair, but then it has to be to incorporate the 4GB onboard memory. Sling it round your neck and the leather earcups are big enough to double as a nice chin rest. If subtlety is your thing, look elsewhere.

We tested the white pair, which was a bit gaudy for our tastes. But it also comes in black.

It’s a solid pair of headphones, and feels like it’s built to take a knock or two. But it’s a bit plasticky, and feels cheap next to the likes of the Bose AE2.

The Sony NWZ-WH303 weighs 292g, which won’t be too noticeable in your bag. It’s worth noting it doesn’t fold up like the Sennheiser PX 200-II or the B&W P3 so it’s not the most portable pair around.

Sony NWZ-WH303: Comfort

The faux-leather earcups and headband make the Sony NWZ-WH303 a comfy pair to wear – after a while, you can easily forget you’re wearing headphones at all, which is a real plus, especially given how chunky a pair it is.

It also doesn’t make your ears too hot after prolonged wearing, which we’ve found on some other on-ear pairs, like the Sol Republic Tracks HD.

Sony NWZ-WH303: Durability

Despite being a bit plasticky, the Sony NWZ-WH303 feels sturdy enough to survive being chucked in a bag along with your other gadgets. The only delicate parts are the controls on the bottom of the right earpiece, but even they should withstand a fair bit of punishment.

Sony NWZ-WH303: Sound quality

So how does it actually sound? Not fantastic, to be honest. There’s a real loss of detail, especially when you play songs through the speakers rather than the headphones. The guitars on AC/DC’s For Those About To Rock (We Salute You) sounded very fuzzy, and this was even more noticeable when pumped up loud. Bass is heavy, but lacks punchiness, and the treble is a bit underwhelming.

They let in a lot of background sound too, which is disappointing for an on-ear pair. Walk around town in them, and you’ll have to crank the volume up to block out the traffic noise. Switch to speaker mode, and they can go loud enough to annoy the bus, or entertain a few pals. But it’s not going to start a party.

The controls are a bit limited. For a start, they’re on the underside of the earcup, which isn’t the most intuitive place for them. They can only control songs stored on the built-in memory, so you can’t use them to control tracks played from an MP3 player.

You can’t fast forward within a song either, you have to skip to the next track or folder. You also can’t play songs from your MP3 player through the Sony NWZ-WH303’s speakers, only tracks stored on the onboard memory. All of which seems a bit of an oversight.

But getting songs onto the flash memory is a doddle. Plug the Sony NWZ-WH303 into your computer, and it’ll appear as an external hard drive would. Then you just drag and drop, or install the Content Transfer program.

Sony NWZ-WH303: Verdict

The Sony NWZ-WH303 gets full points for ingenuity, and it’s a fair price given that it’s effectively three products in one. But it’s more of a (headphone) jack of all trades, and master of none.

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The Westone W40 Review

So i discovered this post on the internet and i heard that just posting it like a whole piece is not the right thing, I got permission from the original writer and read up ways to curate content, so this is it…….i thought this was interesting because it highlights some of the highs and lows that I encountered when i was working in the industry.

headset. earphonesBeneath each buds innocuous plastic frame rests a mighty four pack of razor-thin balanced-armature drivers. The drivers are separated by three crossover points for bass, midrange, and treble, with a claimed frequency range of 10Hz to 18kHz.

Comfort
The W40 fit very snugly, and that helps them achieve their impressive amount of passive noise attenuation. Westone claims the W40 knock off 25 db of noise, and were inclined to agree. Comfort will obviously vary for each person, but once we found the right ear tip for us, the W40 were as comfortable as any bud weve evaluated. Fortunately, the included accessory pouch offers just about every size imaginable. The foam tips were harder to insert and more invasive, but they also stayed put with an iron grip, which could come in handy in more tumultuous environments.

Audio performance
While the W40 could be used in a number of scenarios involving premium electronics and high-quality source material, we think many folks will use them with their smartphones to play back MP3s. So thats how we tested them: MP3s via an iPhone 5. Having done so, we can honestly say that, degraded source file or no, the W40 provided unbridled clarity, vivid definition, and miles of dynamic expression, reminding this reviewer, once again, that he truly does have the best job on the planet.
The W40s detailed sound is so supremely refined that it provided fresh explorations into some of our favorite tracks, creating that sought-after new discovery experience that makes old classics sound brand new again. The W40s provide professional mixing-level clarity, and you could certainly use the W40 in that capacity, or as a live in-ear monitor. Every nuance, muttering vocal, double-tracked guitar, or fluttering sweep of dissipating reverb was laid out in nimble, pristinely separated corridors of the sound stage.
But the W40 arent just accurate. We also found the word beautiful riddled throughout our evaluation notes. Serenely ringing sweeps of an acoustic guitar, or swelling bows from a set of violins often surprised us with their sheer beauty. When youre enamored with the applause at the end of The Beatles Bungalow Bill, you know youre dealing with an impressive set of headphones. The W40 also did well tracing the roots of each instrument in every recording, digging up the inherent colors within and reproducing them, albeit with a taste of the lighter, laser-sharp touch for which balanced-armature drivers are known.
Not surprisingly, the W40 really only showcased their full potential on works with extremely complex, richly-layered dimensions from bands like Radiohead, Depeche Mode, and Stevie Wonder. For example, Before Your Very Eyes by Atoms for Peace sounded almost like a different track altogether. Brand new details came to life, and others that had only been a ghost of a sound, like the wave effect that whirls behind the top layers towards the end of the song, were pulled from the background and aired for the first time in the light of day.
Of course, we do have a couple of nits to pick. As is common in an armature-driver system, the bass wasnt always as potent as we wanted it, and occasionally there was just a shade too much sibilance up top, evidenced by an s or t in a vocal line, or a sharp snap on a snare. But those issues tended to occur only on our lightest or poorest recordings, and the W40 do an excellent job coaxing warmth and fluidity from a design that is often accused of sounding clinical or sterile.

Westone W40 earbud
Also, with due appreciation for the W40s superb sound quality, we think most folks will think they are priced a little high for an in-ear. Still, if you can swing it, they absolutely deliver. The W40 provided us with excellent noise isolation and brilliant portable audio compatibility, with sound quality that will only improve for those who do splurge on a premium playback device. After all, and if youve already thrown down $500 for premium electronics, why not go for the gold with the headphones, too?

Conclusion
Westones W40 offer supreme clarity, ravishing detail, and astonishing dynamic expression, placing them in meager company within the hi-fi landscape. Their $500 price tag has a lot of bite, but then again, the work that goes into cramming four drivers into a tiny bud doesnt come cheap.
These are professional headphones, designed for serious audiophiles and musicians casual listeners need not apply. But if you want an in-ear that gives you a whole new way to explore your aging audio collection, Westones W40 may be the set youve been waiting for.

Touch Bionics creating an app for Prosthesis limbs

I don’t know if you came here because you read it on social media, twitter, facebook, google +, stumble upon or somewhere else. thankyou for visiting and I trust you enjoy reading this as much as I did.

A new bionic hand has been unveiled that can be remote controlled via a smartphone app.

The apps developer, Touch Bionics, unveiled the groundbreaking application, along with their latest prosthetic hand, in April of this year.

The hands artificial thumb is controlled by signals from the users arm muscles, which are interpreted by the hands internal systems. However, in a world first, it can also be controlled, very simply, via the use of the new app.

The app features an array of preset positions that can be selected by the user tapping the screen with her/his thumb. When a position is selected, the prosthesis can react instantly, changing to thumbs up, just a little bit or OK positions easily. The app is not limited to simple positions, however, and more complicated functions, such as holding objects, handling documents and even typing, are featured as preset options.

In addition to the app, the bionic hand also features improved dexterity due to the presence of new extra-sensitive fingertip electrodes. In addition, the thumb can now move into 24 separate positions, made possible either by the user or the app.

The Bionic Touch app configures the hand positions into playlist-like folders such as work, which feature all hand positions regularly used at work (typing, using a mouse etc), so that the positions are within easy reach of the user.

The app itself also features training modes designed to help people learn to use it quickly and easily as well as diagnostic features that can interact with the hand itself and troubleshoot any possible problems.

The app has already received a measure of positive feedback from users, Bertolt Meyer, who uses the new hand, was quoted by New Scientist as saying, “Powered thumb rotation, combined with the mobile app and quick access to all these new grips, gives me natural hand function that I never imagined would be possible,”

Learning to use a prosthetic limb is an extremely painful and frustrating process, but this app may just make the process a tiny bit easier for those who use it.

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Everything you know about earbuds is wrong

With a great deal of information on the net about headphone’s it’s hard to find the best and largely honest articles. here is a piece of writing from a reputable site that i believe to be accurate, do not quote me on it but please read and enjoy

Apple earbuds (left), and Etymotic ER-4 in-ear headphones (right).

It’s easy to understand why there’s so much confusion surrounding the differences between earbud and in-ear headphones. The two designs are sometimes referred to interchangeably, but they are two very different types of headphones. Earbuds rest on the outer concha ridge of the ear, located in the center of your outer ear. In-ear or ear-canal headphones are placed inside the ear canal, sealing the listener off from environmental noise.

A few in-ears — like the Etymotic ER-4 — fit deep into the ear canal to provide maximum isolation. Most in-ears are more comfortable “shallow fit” designs that provide less but still substantial noise reduction.

One not-so-obvious advantage of blocking outside noise is that since you don’t have to play music loud enough to overcome the din, you can listen at much lower, safer levels. In-ears’ noise isolation is a purely passive function; it doesn’t require batteries or electronics. In-ears’ isolation is good, but not as effective at hushing the din as the better noise-canceling in-ear or full-size headphones, which always use batteries and electronics. I find that noise-isolating headphones tend to sound better than noise-canceling headphones.

Phiaton PS210 half in-ear headphones.

Some people find the process of inserting in-ear headphones uncomfortable and don’t like being cut off from the environment, so they will probably find earbuds’ less-intrusive fit more comfortable. Earbuds also have another potentially significant advantage over in-ears: They let you hear more sound in your environment. With earbuds, you won’t feel sealed off from your surroundings, and that’s definitely a plus if you’re exercising, riding a bike, or walking on busy streets. I’m referring to the sort of earbuds that come with phones and iPods.

For best sound quality, I prefer in-ear headphones. Finding great-sounding earbuds is next to impossible, but Phiaton’s PS210 “half in-ear” headphone ($159) bridges the gap; it’s literally a hybrid of the two types of designs.

Walkie-Scorchie problems nearly fixed, Land Securities says

The world is full of very awesome, well written posts. When you find one that catches your eye, you have to repost it, well i do! so with consent of the original blogger i’ve posted this to take pleasure in

Property company Land Securities said it was close to fixing the problems at its Walkie-Talkie City skyscraper after the glare from the building melted car parts on the street below over the summer.

Chief executive Robert Noel said the problems at the building, which is still under construction, would not delay tenants moving in or exceed the budget set aside for its £240m share of the development.

“A solution is in the final stages of design and implementation will commence shortly. Despite the solar glare issue of the summer, occupiers have not been blinded to the efficiency and location of the building. We are close to resolving the issue and it will not delay occupation nor inflate budgeted cost,” he said.

The glare from the 37-storey building, officially known as 20 Fenchurch Street but which has now been nicknamed the “Walkie-Scorchie”, was so strong that a motorist claimed it melted part of his Jaguar parked on the street below.

Business owners in the area said the reflected sun rays caused paintwork to blister and tiles to crack, while others proved the heat was so intense it was possible to fry an egg.

Noel said that the solar shading solution would be installed when the weather improved, and in time for when office workers move in next year in September.

Land Securities is in a joint venture with Canary Wharf Group on the scheme, designed by the architect Rafael Vi.

Vi said in September he predicted the building might reflect hot sun rays to the street below but “didn’t realise it was going to be so hot”.

The building is 56% pre-let, with negotiations on a further 20% of space close to completion.

In terms of Land Securities’ retail portfolio, Noel said while there were signs the UK economy was improving and “the retail market has turned a corner”, consumers remained under pressure.

“Although there is improvement in the UK economy, headwinds persist in retail property as we believe the consumer, with lower real income and faced with rising non-discretionary expenditure, will remain under pressure.

“With an increasing population and healthy demand in all sectors, we view London property as distinct, although not divorced, from the overall UK economy.”

Announcing first-half results for the six months to 30 September, he said net assets per share – a key measure for property companies – rose 3.6% to 994p from 31 March.

The rise was driven by an increase in value of its portfolio and profits on disposals. Underlying earnings increased 8.9% to £156.5m.

He said the market was “highly competitive”, which meant sales of assets would likely exceed spending and acquisitions in the second half.

“It is likely that revenue profit will be slightly lower than in the first half as we lose income from sales.”

Land Securities opened its latest shopping centre, Trinity Leeds, in March, with plans underway for new retail schemes in Glasgow, Oxford and Guildford.

The company announced that Sir Stuart Rose, the former chief executive of Marks & Spencer, will step down as a non-executive director in January.

At the same time Cressida Hogg, the managing partner of infrastructure at 3i, and Edward Bonham Carter, chief executive at Jupiter Fund Management, will join as non-executive directors.

The company recommended a first-half dividend of 15.2p a share, up 2.7%.

Source – http://www.theguardian.com/business/2013/nov/12/walkie-scorchie-glare-problems-nearly-fixed-land-securities

The Oculus Rift: virtual reality is no longer a joke

headset. earphonesWith very little information on the internet about headset’s, it is very rare when we get a chance to re post, with permission, an article from this industry.

The decades most exciting development in computer hardware looks a little like a fat black envelope stuck to a pair of ski goggles, and I had one strapped to my face two months ago as I sat at a desk in the Earls Court Exhibition Centre preparing to fly a Spitfire under a bridge.

Headphones over my ears replaced the thumping bass of the surrounding trade show with the spluttery growl of a Merlin engine. Looking down, I saw a pair of khakied knees and a gloved hand gripping a control yoke; above and to either side, the sun glittered through the cockpit canopy. As I flipped the aircraft into a turn and dive, my senses insisted that I was soaring, upside down, under an iron bridge and into a canyon. But my body and brain remained obstinately upright in a chair in west London, at the glorious mercy of a technology that promises to bring back that most laughable of Nineties computing obsessions: virtual reality.

This device is called the Oculus Rift, and it has come a long way since 2011, when Palmer Luckey, a 19-year-old Californian student, built the prototype from scavenged parts in his parents garage. Luckey was an enthusiastic collector of old VR hardware the clunky headsets that had enjoyed a brief tenure in Nineties amusement arcades and had long dreamt of bringing back the technology in a useful form.

But despite the colourful cyber-predictions of films such as Lawnmower Man, there were good reasons that the virtual reality craze had fizzled out by the millennium. The headsets were too heavy to wear for long, and immersion in the blocky graphics of these early virtual worlds came at a price: a stiff neck, motion sickness and the feeling of wading through treacle.

By 2011, however, the magic combination of accurate motion-sensing with lightweight, high-resolution displays no longer seemed so far off. As Luckey realised, the technology was by then integrated into most decent smartphones. So his prototype Rift used the equivalent of a large smartphone screen to display offset moving images, one for each eye, which the brain combined into an illusion of 3D depth. Head movements were tracked with phone-equivalent gyroscopes and accelerometers, adjusting the view so the user could look freely around a 3D world.

Two years on, Luckeys company Oculus VR is still piggybacking on vicious competition in the smartphone market, as its product lead Joseph Chen freely acknowledges.

Those guys are tearing each other apart trying to get the next best thing, he says. That has basically driven the costs down to where theyre affordable: displays and sensors that used to be hundreds of dollars now cost pennies. Oculus charges just $300 (180) for a low resolution developer kit a kit for companies interested in developing software for the device and has shipped more than 40,000 worldwide, the biggest deployment of virtual reality headsets in history. It has raised $91million (55.5 million) in investment funding and done this without actually having a product on the market: you cant buy it in shops until next year.

The excitement surrounding the Oculus was palpable at the Eurogamer Expo, the games show where I tried out its second-generation prototype. This is understandable: to many enthusiasts, the prospect of stepping wholesale into a virtual fantasy world fulfils one of the oldest promises of the medium.

An example of the view using an Oculus Rift

But theres more to this technology than gaming. Among the demonstrations Chen showed me was a London tourism experience, built from 360-degree camera views of locations in the capital by the media agency Visualise. The viewer begins perched on top of the London Eye wheel, staring out over the capital, and can beam into various 3D-modelled locations across town London Zoo, the Gherkin, Piccadilly Circus by a shift of visual focus.

Another demonstration by Arch Virtual, a business that creates 3D software for a wide range of clients, offered a virtual tour of an architects concept house. Using a controller, I was able to walk wherever I liked in the building. The sense of inhabiting real space in these demonstrations was astonishing.

Jon Brouchoud, the Wisconsin-based architect who runs Arch Virtual, says that using the Rift developer kit transformed the way he designs. Any time youre looking at an architectural illustration projected onto a screen its distorted, he tells me. Theres a natural distortion based on the way 3D maps onto a 2D surface. Put the same environment in the Oculus Rift and its completely different. Being able to stand inside a space, go back to the drawing board and then stand inside it again completely changes the way you design a building. If this isnt the game-changer for architecture, I dont know what is.

Arch Virtual, Brouchoud says, has also taken on several secret projects for medical clients. VR technology has already been used to aid neurological recovery from trauma, as well as to treat conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder, post-stroke rehabilitation and phantom limb syndrome.

Andrew Poulter, an expert in computer science and simulation at the MoDs Defence Science and Technology Laboratory, envisages still other applications for the technology hinted at by the Rift. In the past two years the US army has spent $57million (35million) on an immersive training simulator called the Dismounted Soldier Training System, which tracks not just head movement but limb positioning and weapon movements.

In Britain, Poulter explains, head-mounted VR technology is still only being used experimentally, within a research context, although his lab has been looking closely at developer versions of the Rift.

A visitor to a trade show tries out the Oculus Rift

A good deal of British military training, Poulter explains, is still done with on-screen computer programs. But the Oculus Rift, he says, represents a new class of hardware with real potential. And it is games technology that now sets the trend for the defence industry, not the other way around. The defence budgets of even the largest countries are relatively small compared to the massive budgets that the entertainment industry has.

Its easy to forget that none of this technology is really available yet. Oculus is shipping only to developers with the technical know-how to plumb the depths of the software, while many of its prospective rivals remain shrouded in mystery. A few weeks ago, Sony filed a patent related to a head-mounted display, seeming to lend credence to rumours that it plans to launch a VR headset in 2014 for the PlayStation 4.

But the competition is certainly gathering. A device called the CastAR, which overlays 3D images onto a real-world view, recently completed a successful run on the crowdfunding site Kickstarter and has entered production. On the morning that I sat down to write this piece, news broke that another Oculus rival, the gloriously sci-fi sounding Avegant Glyph, will take to Kickstarter in January: it promises to project 3D images onto the human retina and fold up into a pair of headphones when youre done with it.

The team at Oculus, meanwhile, promises a further revolution in display technology when it exhibits a new prototype at the Consumer Electronics Show in January, and says it will have goggles in the hands of consumers by the end of the year. Looking forward into this immersive future, one is tempted to agree with the 90-year-old lady whose experience with the Oculus Rift has attracted more than two million viewers on YouTube.

This is something else, she exclaims raptly, clutching the visor to her face with both hands. Am I still sitting where I was? Holy mackerel!

Glyph: Headset from Avegant beams video into your eyes

headset. earphonesThis piece is posted by the faithful authorization of headset.com, that is the original blog. please get permission from that blog before reposting this editorial.

Forget about the big screen, the small screen and even the second screen.

A headset, http://www.wrolebanon.org/kenwood-2-pin-and-kenwood-multi-pin-connectors-what-earpieces-work-on-those-2-way-radio, due to be released this year promises to beam movies, video games or even video calls directly into your eyeballs.

Yes. The Glyph headset, from Ann Arbor, Michigan-based Avegant, will create visuals that don’t need a screen — just your retinas and your brain.

If that conjures up exciting images of living like “Star Trek’s” Geordi La Forge or Cyclops from “The X Men,” you’re not alone.

A Kickstarter campaign was launched last month and set out to raise $250,000 to bankroll the project. It blew past that mark with ease and, with half a month left, was on the verge of breaking the $1 million mark Wednesday.

“We knew we had something really cool and that we’d do well on Kickstarter, but nobody thought we’d hit our goal in less than four hours,” said Edward Tang, Avegant’s CEO. “It’s like ordering flowers for your girlfriend and they show up with a whole truck full of flowers.”

The technology that powers the Glyph centers around a set of 2 million microscopic mirrors — 1 million per eye — that reflect visuals, including 3-D, into the user’s eye.

Unlike some entries into the emerging wearable tech field, the Glyph won’t be limited to a set of specially designed apps. Tang said the headset, which donors can receive for a $499 “donation” to the campaign, is designed to plug into just about anything you own that has a screen — be it a smartphone, laptop, television or gaming console.

Users would play the video content on their mobile or entertainment device but watch it on the Glyph instead of their device’s screen. The Glyph has a battery life of about three hours, Tang said.

“I think Google Glass is really interesting … (but) I think it’s a couple years away,” he said. “If you ask people what they’re doing with their devices today, they’re streaming Netflix, they’re playing video games and they’re listening to music. We created a device that really focused on those aspects.”

The startup also wanted to avoid the “Glasshole” effect. Google promises Glass will be stylish when it’s released to the public, but the look of early test versions has been distracting to some and downright jarring to others.

Glyph, on the other hand, looks like a pair of headphones sitting on the user’s head when not in use. In fact, it doubles as a pair of high-end headphones with noise canceling that compares with some of the leading brands on the market, according to Avegant. To add visuals, the user flips down the band over their head, making it an eyepiece.

The company has opened the headset to outside developers, who they hope will find unexpected uses for its features, which include head-tracking technology.

“By giving developers this brand new tool box, they start to think of amazing applications that we couldn’t in our wildest dreams come up with,” Tang said.

But, wait. Mom always said not to sit too close to the TV set. And we all know that bleary-eyed feeling we get from staring at a smartphone or tablet for too long. Won’t this be worse?

Quite the opposite, Tang said.

He said eye fatigue comes from staring at the artificial, pixelated light from our screens. Remove the screen, remove the problem.

“We agree with the moms of the world,” he said. “What we’re doing is mimicking the actual light around you … . It’s the kind of light that your eyes have been conditioned to see, have evolved to see.”

It’s all so magically futuristic sounding. Which raises an obvious question: Is Glyph all hype?

Folks who have taken an early look don’t think so. At January’s International Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Glyph was one of 40 products chosen for the Editor’s Choice Award. More than 3,200 exhibitors attended the show.

“What I could tell was that the projected image, just like my last time with Avegant’s virtual retinal display tech, was exceedingly bright and vivid, lacking any sense of pixelation,” CNET’s Scott Stein wrote from CES. “A deep-sea 3-D movie looked like it was projected in a tiny little movie theater in front of my eyes.”

David Pierce wrote for The Verge: ” ‘Life of Pi’ displayed perfectly in 3-D without any tweaking, and I played ‘Call of Duty: Ghosts’ right off a PlayStation 3. All you need to do is to tune the glasses — you focus each eye individually, then set the two eyeholes the right distance apart so they create a single picture. From then on, content just works.”

The Kickstarter campaign runs through February 21. Avegant plans to ship units to donors by the end of the year and says the model that will ship will be smaller and lighter than the test models on display.

Avegant is based in the heart of Michigan’s manufacturing region and hopes to manufacture the Glyph as much as possible in the United States, Tang said.

Noise Cancelling Headset Allows You To Have A Peace of Mind

I don’t know if you came here as you read it on social media, twitter, facebook, google +, stumble upon or anywhere else. But thank you for visiting and I trust you like reading this as much as I did.

There are two types of headphones, In- Ear headphones and Over- the- Ear headphones.

Before buying a headset you must take into account some factors. First of all you should see your requirements and then choose. If you are a person who frequently travels a lot and obviously wants to save space, then you should go with In- ear style of headphones. Unfortunately, the quality of sound is not that good comparative to the Over-the-Ear headphones.

However, if you are a person who doesn’t travel much and it is easier for you to carry things then Over-the-Ear headphones must be your first choice. Fortunately, due to their increasing popularity, some companies have now introduced some new models which can be folded to fit in you bag.
With the most excellent sound quality, it takes an edge over the In-Ear headphones. You must take into account some features before buying a headset. First and the foremost is that you must check the stated capability of noise reduction. You ought to compare between different models and brands and check the views of other customers that have previously used them.

A good noise cancelling headset will facilitate you with a marvelous quality of sound.

The second thing you must look in is comfort. Make sure that your headset is comfortable when you wear it for longer periods of time. Moreover, check the weight and see if it has the facility of being folded. If you wish to wear your wireless headsets for long conference calls or listen to music, you must ensure that that they are light weight.

Another very important feature is the length of cord. If you wish to watch a movie on your TV with your headset, make sure that it has a long cord.

If you wish to enjoy every rhythm and beat of your music without any interruption or disturbance from your surroundings, then a noise cancelling headset is the ideal device for you. It is also an ideal device for gamers who want to fully experience their video game without any disturbance from the outside.

It is also useful when you want some silence and wants to read a good book. If you are a person who likes silence and wants peace to concentrate then you should at once buy one of these headsets.

You have the advantage of going online and buying different models that best suits your requirements. Consider different companies that manufacture these headsets and compare the features. Many of us work in surroundings where there is a lot of disturbing noise.

The noise canceling headset can offer you a peace of mind. Sound is basically a transmission of waves through some medium. Most of the times, the medium is air so these headsets create a barrier. Because of this barrier a lot of energy in these sound waves is eliminated.